• Name:

    Beared Fireworm

    (View AKA's)
  • Family: Amphinomidae
  • Species: Worms
  • Scientific Name: Polychaeta
More Details

Also Know As:

| Bristle Worms

| Bristleworms

General info about Beared Fireworm

The Bristle Worm has a tail and a segmented body, and typically each body segment has a pair of leg-like parapodia with spiny hairs on the sides called bristles that sticking out. These little hairs or bristles give the worms it's named. The word Polychaete is Greek and means "with much hair." While there are over 10,000 different worms that are considered “bristle worm” there are two different types of worms that we are concerned with and that is if it is "Reef Safe" or "Not Reef Safe".

The while the Common Bristle Worm's bristles can irritate your skin when a Fireworm bristle comes in contact with your skin it hurts and is often referred to feel like a bee sting. Your skin will feel like it's on fire and that is how this bristle worm gots the name Fireworm. Fireworms typically have a heavier body and pronounced bristles that are white. Fireworms typically have a reddish outline color on the outskirts of their bristles.

They normally have a pink or gray body and pose limited harm to anything in your tank how they only sting things that touch their bristles. If you plan to handle them in any way for whatever reason you should wear gloves. The bristles are mostly there to defend itself.

All Bristle Worms are nocturnal most aquariums have them and you may never see them unless you look for them at night. If they come out during the day it is typically because they are starving and feel like there is no risk for them. Late at night after the lights have been out for some time, you can use a red flashlight (they typically do not respond to the red light) and you will see the nightlife of your tank which will normally include several worms as well.

In some cases, Common Bristle Worms can quickly multiply if you are overfeeding your tank. The Common Bristle Worm is a scavenger feeder that will eat leftover food or decaying proteins in your tank. If you feel like there are too many you may want to consider adding a wrasse fish to your tank. Wrasse's stay very active in your tank and are known to constantly hunt down small invertebrates and worms in your tank.

Beared Fireworm Diet & Nutrition

Bristle Worms are a bottom-feeding scavenger and will eat different types of detritus as well as algae, uneaten fish food, and even fish waste. The Bristle Worms are able to reach the tough to reach places that most species have a hard time getting to like tiny pores/holes, and cracks in your rock. If you do not have any worms to get this food then it will rot and cause water quality issues over time.

Caution with Beared Fireworm

Handle with care and always ware gloved if you plan to handle Fireworms, their bristles can release into your skin and can cause pain. In many cases, the pain has been described as a bee sting and cause your skin to feel like it's on fire. 

Original Detail

Name Species Family Scientific Name More Detail Added by
Beared Fireworm Worms Amphinomidae Polychaeta

The Bristle Worm has a tail and a segmented body, and typically each body segment has a pair of leg-like parapodia with spiny hairs on the sides called bristles that sticking out. These little hairs or bristles give the worms it's named. The word Polychaete is Greek and means "with much hair." While there are over 10,000 different worms that are considered “bristle worm” there are two different types of worms that we are concerned with and that is if it is "Reef Safe" or "Not Reef Safe".

The while the Common Bristle Worm's bristles can irritate your skin when a Fireworm bristle comes in contact with your skin it hurts and is often referred to feel like a bee sting. Your skin will feel like it's on fire and that is how this bristle worm gots the name Fireworm. Fireworms typically have a heavier body and pronounced bristles that are white. Fireworms typically have a reddish outline color on the outskirts of their bristles.

They normally have a pink or gray body and pose limited harm to anything in your tank how they only sting things that touch their bristles. If you plan to handle them in any way for whatever reason you should wear gloves. The bristles are mostly there to defend itself.

All Bristle Worms are nocturnal most aquariums have them and you may never see them unless you look for them at night. If they come out during the day it is typically because they are starving and feel like there is no risk for them. Late at night after the lights have been out for some time, you can use a red flashlight (they typically do not respond to the red light) and you will see the nightlife of your tank which will normally include several worms as well.

In some cases, Common Bristle Worms can quickly multiply if you are overfeeding your tank. The Common Bristle Worm is a scavenger feeder that will eat leftover food or decaying proteins in your tank. If you feel like there are too many you may want to consider adding a wrasse fish to your tank. Wrasse's stay very active in your tank and are known to constantly hunt down small invertebrates and worms in your tank.

Tony Palacios

Changed by users

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