• Name: Red Cherry Shrimp (View AKA's)
  • Family:
  • Species: Shrimp
  • Scientific Name:
More Details

Also Know As:

  • Red Shrimp
  • Cherry Shrimp
  • General

    Red Cherry Shrimp is a freshwater shrimp from Taiwan. Red Cherry shrimps are a breed of shrimp known as Neocaridina denticulata sinensis or Neocaridina davidi. Despite it exist in many colors in nature, for years of selected breeding for aquariums result in red color. With its bright color, it will add beauty to a tank especially against plants and darker substrates. It is a perfect candidate for beginners because red cherry shrimp are incredibly hardy and condition tolerant when compared to other varieties of shrimp. Also, they are easy to breed, maintain and they will naturally hide from predators. Red Cherry Shrimp lifespan is about a year, or a little longer if tank conditions are right. Even a trace of copper can be deadly for shrimps so be sure to avoid from copper.

    Stable water parameters are necessary for keeping Red Cherry Shrimp. They have a wide range of acceptable parameters such as a pH range of 6.0-7.6 and an acceptable temperature range of 77-81°F. As long as the parameters are stable within the acceptable range, Cherry Red Shrimp will flourish in the aquarium. A good filtration system and frequent water changes are needed to keep water parameters stable. Due to the small size of Red Cherry Shrimp, a sponge filter or power filter with a sponge pre-filter is recommended. Water changes of 20% a month are all that is necessary to keep Red Cherry Shrimp healthy as long as you do not overfeed the tank.

    Diet & Nutrition

    Red Cherry Shrimp feeding is not tricky at all, but it requires constant feeding. They are omnivorous requiring a balanced diet of fresh vegetables and processed foods are recommended for daily breeding. When keeping Red Cherry Shrimp in the aquarium, the three most common foods are algae, blanched vegetable, and prepared aquarium foods. Supplemental feeding is often not necessary, and that heavy feeding tends to degrade water quality in the aquarium. If there is excess food in the tank from the last feeding, remove the food and add smaller amounts at feeding time. This will help with keeping ammonia and nitrites at 0.

    They will eat many types of algae found in the aquarium, and often the algae found naturally in aquariums is enough food to support a moderate Cherry Red Shrimp population. Soft green or brown algae that grow on hard surfaces and soft bio-film algae are among their natural diet. Unfortunately, they will not eat string/hair algae, so they are not a good control measure for those types of algae.

    There are a few foods that are manufactured specifically for invertebrates, such as Hikari Crab Cuisine, and these foods are readily accepted. Another one is Shirakura Red Shrimp Food which is a special diet which specifically engineered in Japan for aquarium shrimp.

    Moreover, any sinking pellet type food works well as a food source like fish flakes, shrimp pellets, fish pellets. Be sure to read the ingredients label carefully, any food containing copper should not be used. (Copper Sulfate is a common ingredient in fish foods)

    They will also accept blanched vegetables, frozen foods and all kinds of sinking fish foods. Vegetables such as Zucchini, Lettuce, Spinach, and Carrots are commonly used for feeding. When preparing these vegetables, place them in boiling water until they are soft, 2-3 minutes for leafy vegetables and longer for carrots and zucchini. Small amounts of each should be fed at a time and make sure never to leave rotting food in the aquarium.

    Red Cherry Shrimp are great scavengers that will help to keep a tank clean of uneaten food, and debris like Amano Shrimp and Nerite Snails do. However, they can not be categorized as tank cleaners because of their small size. Thinking them as tank cleaning worker may result in negative consequences.

    Determining Sex

    Males have a lighter texture and less red coloration compared to the females. Females can generally be larger and become a deep crimson red during pregnancy.

    Breeding & Spawning

    If you aim to breed red cherry shrimp, a shrimp only tank is recommended. Red Cherry Shrimp should never be put in a tank with other Neocaridina species to avoid cross breeding. They can be kept with Caridina species such as Amano Shrimp, Bee Shrimp, and Crystal Red Shrimp. While Crystal Red and Bee Shrimp require lower pHs and temperatures that are common in the aquarium to breed, they will live just fine in most water parameters that Red Cherry Shrimp will live and reproduce in.

    Red cherry shrimp are among the most simple of freshwater shrimp species to breed in the aquarium. By slowly moving the water temperature a little higher to around 81-82°F (27°C) it simulates summer environments to RCS and naturally prompts the beginning of breeding. Filling your tank with patches of thick plant cover is essential. It will give the Red Cherry shrimp piece of mind and safety needed for breeding. In tandem with raising the water temperature, raising the relative hardness of the water can spur breeding. Harder water signals higher levels of calcium and minerals necessary for maturation of eggs. It can be obtained by adding a small bag of limestone chips to the filter.

    A female shrimp will carry her eggs under her tail, and that means she is “berried”. Within weeks there should be visible signs of berried females with visible rows of hundreds of eggs beneath their tails. They will continuously fan the eggs to ensure they remain oxygenated and healthy. At this point, it is essential to use an aerator instead of a filter. Alternatively, thick layers of filter wool can be used to block and slow any large intake siphons.

    If you find your shrimp are becoming pregnant but you never see any young, make sure the temperature is still around 81-82°F and be sure to check filter intakes are covered by stocking or foam or something to prevent the babies from being sucked inside. Also be sure to check the filter intakes are covered by a thick stocking or wool.

    The baby, Red Cherry shrimp, will be born straight into miniature versions of the adults. There is no median phase for the shrimp. Only when they grow into adults will you be able to identify their sex. Males have a lighter texture and less red coloration to the females. Females can generally be larger and become a deep crimson red during pregnancy.

    It is good to have many live plants that can grow fine, dense leaves, like Anacharis, Cabomba or Water Sprite, so the baby shrimp have a place to hide as they grow.

    To reach healthy fertility with an acceptable ratio purchase at least ten shrimp when starting out.

    Diseases

    Plants in the tanks could be sometimes dangerous for Shrimps. When it comes to disasters and keeping shrimp, CO2 injection is probably the biggest killer. When CO2 is added to aquarium water, it dissolves and is absorbed by the plants for photosynthesis. When there is no light source (at night for instance), CO2 is not utilized by the plants and instead forms carbonic acid in the water. The pH swing sometimes can be dramatic from day to night. Red Cherry shrimp, cannot handle the swing in PH nor the lack of oxygen.


    Using CO2 injection and caring for red cherry shrimp needs to be done carefully. It may not be as simple as using a solenoid valve only to inject CO2 during light hours. Horror stories have arisen where hobbyists forgot to reset their light timers. In the morning when the lights do not turn on but the CO2 starts bubbling there is a danger for a giant PH swing and a high risk of stressing your shrimp.

    Fertilizer additives need to be carefully checked before adding them to a Red Cherry shrimp aquarium. All copper and heavy metal additives should be avoided.

    Origination

    Their origin is from Taiwan.

    Caution

    They will never harm any tankmates, but bigger fish that can fit a red cherry shrimp in its mouth shouldn't be in the same aquarium.

    If you keep higher and more expensive grades, it might be a good idea to set up a single species aquarium, though peaceful inverts like other shrimp and small snails are always a possibility. Aquarists who keep lower grade Red Cherry shrimp and don't mind losing some of their stock can keep them with some peaceful tankmates. Recommended tank mates include tetras, guppies, and smaller barbs.

    Ammonia, Nitrite, and Nitrate are all very harmful to red shrimp and should be filtered for a healthy aquarium. A cycled and well-maintained filtration system will eliminate Ammonia and Nitrate. Nitrate is the byproduct of the filter eliminating Ammonia and Nitrite and is removed by water changes or by growing plants. Aquatic plants use Nitrate as a source of nitrogen and help reduce this element in the water column. However, fertilizers used to maintain plants can kill Cherry Red Shrimp because of the copper found in many aquatic plant fertilizers.

    Acclimation Process

    It is important to remember that although CRS are hardy shrimp, they are still sensitive to fluctuations in water chemistry. Ensure the aquarium has been chemically tested and it is within the parameters as such; 77-81°F and pH range of 6.2-7.3

    Although Red Cherry shrimp are hardy and tolerant, they are susceptible to rapid changes. To add the RCS to the aquarium first add them from the bag into a large bowl with the accompanying water. Using airline tubing and a rubber band, create a siphon from the aquarium and kink the tubing by placing the rubber band over a bent section of the tube. Adjust the kink to allow a slow drip of 1 drop of water per second exiting the tube. Let this drip into the bowl for the next 20-30 minutes and monitor closely. After 20-30 minutes carefully use a soft mesh net to transfer the shrimp into the aquarium. Be sure to cover the net with one hand when moving the RCS from the bowl as shrimp jump and can escape the net.

    Cherry shrimp like many fish will become stressed if the water quality is not optimal. They are usually very active and early warning signs become apparent if they will not move, or they swim up to the surface and then float. Avoid this situation by conducting constant water tests, using appropriate dechlorinates and ensuring the tank has completed cycling.

    If a situation does arise check the water immediately, perform a water change and try to identify the problem. If you have more than one aquarium moving the RCS to a suitable temporary home, even if the conditions are sub-optimal is often far better than leaving them in a toxic aquarium.

     

    Original Detail

    Name Species Family Scientific Name More Detail Added by
    Red Cherry Shrimp Shrimp <p>Red Cherry Shrimp is a freshwater shrimp from Taiwan. Red Cherry shrimps are a breed of shrimp known as Neocaridina denticulata sinensis or Neocaridina davidi. Despite it exist in many colors in nature, for years of selected breeding for aquariums result in red color. With its bright color, it will add beauty to a tank especially against plants and darker substrates. It is a perfect candidate for beginners because red cherry shrimp are incredibly hardy and condition tolerant when compared to other varieties of shrimp. Also, they are easy to breed, maintain and they will naturally hide from predators. Red Cherry Shrimp lifespan is about a year, or a little longer if tank conditions are right. Even a trace of copper can be deadly for shrimps so be sure to avoid from copper.</p> <p>Stable water parameters are necessary for keeping Red Cherry Shrimp. They have a wide range of acceptable parameters such as a pH range of 6.0-7.6 and an acceptable temperature range of 77-81°F. As long as the parameters are stable within the acceptable range, Cherry Red Shrimp will flourish in the aquarium. A good filtration system and frequent water changes are needed to keep water parameters stable. Due to the small size of Red Cherry Shrimp, a sponge filter or power filter with a sponge pre-filter is recommended. Water changes of 20% a month are all that is necessary to keep Red Cherry Shrimp healthy as long as you do not overfeed the tank.</p> Tony Palacios

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